I used to run a thinspo blog, and it made me miserable. Amid a sea of collarbones, hip bones and thigh gaps, my hourglass figure didn't feel sexy, it felt fat. With the same measurements as Sofia Vergara, I'm done with feeling ashamed of my body. This is my celebration of curves, welcome.


Irspoopy sent in this beautiful submission, along with her thoughts:
"I think everybody struggles with body issues, but I’ve been lucky enough never to have a problem with my body until over the summer. For some reason, this summer my dad and grandmother began to comment on my weight. I would come home from a twelve hour shift and start to make myself dinner; and my dad’s immediate response was “You’re eating at eleven o’clock?” I offhandedly mentioned one evening after purchasing a pretty new bra that I hoped my breasts wouldn’t grown anymore, so I could continue to wear it, and he replied, “Well, maybe if you ate less ice cream that wouldn’t be a problem.” I would order a burger at a restaurant, and my grandmother would comment, “You’re never going to lose weight that way.” I found it odd because I wasn’t trying to lose weight. I had no intention, and I didn’t and don’t have any problems with wearing size fourteen pants. But I started questioning myself because of these comments. I have been confident in my body for my entire life, and I would’ve thought that my father would’ve been proud of that confidence and my refusal to buy pants that were too small, to ask “do I look skinny in this?”, and to constantly adopt random and dangerous diets in a desperate attempt to be four sizes smaller than I’m physically capable of being, due to my wide hipbones. I thought he would be proud of my pride in myself, in my self-assurance, and how this made me (what I thought to be) a positive role model, in the absence of our mother, for my younger sister, who has constantly struggled with self confidence and is completely unaware of how stunning she is. I’d always loved my curves, I thought they were sexy. But it was hard for me to believe that when I was hearing in both ears that I had love handles, that my shorts were too short for someone “my size” (the same shorts were not, however, too short for my sister), and that I needed to lose weight, even though I only weigh 155 pounds.
I know they had my best interests at heart. I know they were trying to help. I know they’re thinking of my health when they said things like this. But no matter how good their intentions were, these comments were hurtful. I believe they thought, since I’m not easily offended and rarely take things to heart, that it was okay to say things like this because it was meant positively (despite the negative tone they often used). But it was not okay, and it is not okay.
What I’m trying to say is, I’m glad that there are resources like this one out there to remind people like me that it’s okay to be whatever size you are. So thanks for that.
To people who’ve received criticism regarding their size or shape, remember that the only person who is allowed to tell you to lose or gain weight is your doctor, and that the only reason you ever need to lose or gain weight is for your health. If you are healthy and happy with how you are, then you have the right to stay that way.
And to people, even those with the best intentions, who suggest to someone that they should lose or gain weight: STOP. You are not a doctor. If a person wants your input, they’ll ask. If a person does ask, don’t give them your opinion, give them your support. No matter how well-intended comments like, “I think you’d be happier if you lost weight,” or, “You might feel better if you had an apple instead,” might be, they are HURTFUL. People are people, and they should be treasured for being the way they are, not for what they could be if they put away the ice cream.”
I absolutely adore your message! Everything you’ve said is very true. 
6 months ago | 05:31pm

Irspoopy sent in this beautiful submission, along with her thoughts:

"I think everybody struggles with body issues, but I’ve been lucky enough never to have a problem with my body until over the summer. For some reason, this summer my dad and grandmother began to comment on my weight. I would come home from a twelve hour shift and start to make myself dinner; and my dad’s immediate response was “You’re eating at eleven o’clock?” I offhandedly mentioned one evening after purchasing a pretty new bra that I hoped my breasts wouldn’t grown anymore, so I could continue to wear it, and he replied, “Well, maybe if you ate less ice cream that wouldn’t be a problem.” I would order a burger at a restaurant, and my grandmother would comment, “You’re never going to lose weight that way.” I found it odd because I wasn’t trying to lose weight. I had no intention, and I didn’t and don’t have any problems with wearing size fourteen pants. But I started questioning myself because of these comments. I have been confident in my body for my entire life, and I would’ve thought that my father would’ve been proud of that confidence and my refusal to buy pants that were too small, to ask “do I look skinny in this?”, and to constantly adopt random and dangerous diets in a desperate attempt to be four sizes smaller than I’m physically capable of being, due to my wide hipbones. I thought he would be proud of my pride in myself, in my self-assurance, and how this made me (what I thought to be) a positive role model, in the absence of our mother, for my younger sister, who has constantly struggled with self confidence and is completely unaware of how stunning she is. I’d always loved my curves, I thought they were sexy. But it was hard for me to believe that when I was hearing in both ears that I had love handles, that my shorts were too short for someone “my size” (the same shorts were not, however, too short for my sister), and that I needed to lose weight, even though I only weigh 155 pounds.

I know they had my best interests at heart. I know they were trying to help. I know they’re thinking of my health when they said things like this. But no matter how good their intentions were, these comments were hurtful. I believe they thought, since I’m not easily offended and rarely take things to heart, that it was okay to say things like this because it was meant positively (despite the negative tone they often used). But it was not okay, and it is not okay.

What I’m trying to say is, I’m glad that there are resources like this one out there to remind people like me that it’s okay to be whatever size you are. So thanks for that.

To people who’ve received criticism regarding their size or shape, remember that the only person who is allowed to tell you to lose or gain weight is your doctor, and that the only reason you ever need to lose or gain weight is for your health. If you are healthy and happy with how you are, then you have the right to stay that way.

And to people, even those with the best intentions, who suggest to someone that they should lose or gain weight: STOP. You are not a doctor. If a person wants your input, they’ll ask. If a person does ask, don’t give them your opinion, give them your support. No matter how well-intended comments like, “I think you’d be happier if you lost weight,” or, “You might feel better if you had an apple instead,” might be, they are HURTFUL. People are people, and they should be treasured for being the way they are, not for what they could be if they put away the ice cream.”

I absolutely adore your message! Everything you’ve said is very true. 

215 notes · #body positivity #body positive #body posi #body acceptance #body image #self image #self esteem #submission #self love #weight #weight loss #positivity #positive #gorgeous #beautiful
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